More than a Century of Inspiration

With over a century of diabetes experience between them Joslin Medalists Tom and Richard share their experiences in a gentle, inspirational video chat.

TuDiabetes hosted a video chat with Joslin Medalists Tom and Richard last week.

For me the best moment was when Tom shared a story about experiencing a hypo while on the golf course. He had forgotten to put some sugar candy in with his clubs and had to ask his friends to go get him some candy from the clubhouse so he could bring his blood sugar back up.

“That was careless,” he said.

“That was careless.” It struck me how gentle he was with himself. He didn’t say he say he was stupid or made a mistake. He didn’t make a big deal out of it. It was only a moment of carelessness. He understood what he needed to do differently next time. That is all.

Dear Rep. Giffords, Thank you for being an inspiration

Source: Flickr CC aemerybrown-SA 2.0

Rep. Gabby Giffords announced Sunday that she is resigning her seat in Congress to focus on her recovery from last year’s attempt on her life. Watching the video of her limping down the sidewalk with her husband at her side and then telling the world she’s resigning was heart wrenching.

Here is a young, vital woman speaking slowly, clearly and deliberately to get her message across. The damaging effects of the bullet she took are readily apparent.

Yet her words are full of hope. She is focusing on her therapy/recovery. She looks to the future. While she’s already beat the odds on even surviving, she is clearly not settling for what she’s achieved so far.

  • Rep. Gifford’s recovery is a 24/7 thing — just like living with diabetes.
  • Her future and her future state of health are uncertain — just like living with diabetes.
  • Each day requires focus and effort and dedication — just like living with diabetes.

Yes, yes, there is no “full recovery” from diabetes. The reality is for Rep. Giffords there is no “full recovery” from her injuries — her life and health won’t ever go back to what they were before being shot.

She chooses to move ahead.

And I choose to be inspired by that.

To Live Well, Don’t Be Disabled in Spirit

…Don’t be disabled in spirit, as well as physically.”
—Stephen Hawking

Source: Flickr (cc)keeping it real

“My advice to other disabled people would be, concentrate on things your disability doesn’t prevent you doing well, and don’t regret the things it interferes with. Don’t be disabled in spirit, as well as physically.”
—Stephen Hawking

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking gave a surprisingly personal interview to the New York Times. In it he talks about what his life has been like with A.L.S. (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and how lucky he is to work in a field where having this disease is not a handicap.

While diabetes doesn’t necessarily lead to disability, it can put limits on what a PWD can do.

But here’s a man who cannot move his body and yet he’s traveled the world—even gone into zero gravity. He communicates by twitching his cheek and yet he’s written revolutionary descriptions of how our complex universe works.

Stephen Hawking is an inspiration.

Simply put he’s saying don’t focus on the cannot in the world. It’s a waste of time and energy. Focus on the can in the world.

This is one of the secrets to living well with (or without) diabetes.

This Is NOT Helpful…

They put a bunch of data from other studies into a one big pool and came up with…a statistic. That’s it. …

Source: Flickr - couragextoxlive

Diabetes Can Shorten Life by 6 Years, the headline screamed.

“A 50-year-old with diabetes dies six years sooner than someone without the disease…”

Oh my! I know a 50-year-old who happens to live with diabetes. What can be done to help her avoid this awful fate? Continue reading “This Is NOT Helpful…”

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Three Ways to Avoid Causing an International Incident

It’s Chinese New Year and we are welcoming the Year of the Rabbit. Every aspect of this holiday is filled with tradition and meaning. And, as my friend Joanne pointed out to me, most of it involves food and eating.

Source: Flickr (cc) beggs

Wishing you prosperity!

It’s Chinese New Year and we are welcoming the Year of the Rabbit. Every aspect of this holiday is filled with tradition and meaning. And, as my friend Joanne pointed out to me, most of it involves food and eating.

The first sign of celebration is when the lion dancers invade the office. A cacophony of drums, cymbals and gongs announce the lion who winds his way through the cubicles. All work stops. Along the way the lion “eats the green.” Be sure to feed the lion some green (i.e., money) to insure prosperity in the new year.

During New Years gifts of food are exchanged. And families gather for feasts. Each food brings its own good wishes for the new year. Oranges are for good luck and wealth. Noodles are for long life—the longer the better. A whole fish is for abundance. Gao symbolizes reaching new heights. Sweets bring a sweet life.

Gao? What’s that? Sweets? Uh oh.

Continue reading “Gung Hay Fat Choy! Three Ways to Avoid Causing an International Incident”